martedì 10 gennaio 2017

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The Spada Collection is housed in an old shoe factory, the fratelli Gidiuli, located inside Palazzo Prete in Lecce. Visiting a house-museum has the privilege, compared to traditional public museums, not to disperse, not to be overwhelmed by dozens of visitors and guides: the house-museum has the opportunity to try an instrument, discuss, exchange views ahead a cup of coffee offered by the landlord.


The collection has over 850 instruments built by the mid-seventeenth century to the early twentieth century, as well as two small collections, a Peruvian flutes notched, pre-Columbian age, some in the barrel and other bone, and other non-European ethnic instruments. It also consists of an important iconographic and a library of more than two hundred scores, manuscripts and books musical theme: a section is dedicated to composers and bands of Puglia, with their history, and their apparel, and a particular genre, the funeral march, peculiar to the rites of Holy Week in Taranto species. Preserve the authenticity of the instrument as its manufacturer so heard where they manufactured: This work was done on some instruments were made in respect of an idea of ​​the more than functional restoration, using diagnostic techniques and targeted restoration to preserve woods, metals , glues and original paints. Through a touch screen terminal, visitors can play virtually hosted some of the tools from the collection, each piece will read a description, listen to the sound and to approach, through a short film, the posture of the player and the playing technique. The route is enriched by audio-visual projections and sound contributions; each room is equipped with teaching aids that can provide information in a comprehensible form, limiting the technical terms or at least explaining its meaning, to allow the visit even without the catalog.

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TOUR VIRTUALE

CLICK ON SECTION AND GO TO THE WAREHOUSE OF MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS

EVENTI E MOSTRE


·         Il 18 giugno 2017 la Casa Museo Spada Antichi Strumenti Musicali parteciperà alla giornata nazionale dei Piccoli Musei e sarà aperta gratuitamente dalle 10,00 del mattino alle 20,00 accogliendo ogni visitatore con un omaggio: uno strumento musicale.
·         Famiglie al museo, 9 ottobre 2016 Lecce, giornata dedicata alla visita e ai laboratori musicale e museologici per famiglie.
·         Museo all'aperto, Le trombe tra musica e storia, 29 giugno 2016 Grottaglie, concerto-lezione di trombe di S. Pietro e altri corni rituali tra i vicolo di Grottaglie.
·         La notte dei musei, 21 maggio 2016 Lecce, visite guidate alla collezione e esibizione di musicisti salentini.
·         Ponte al Museo, 24 aprile – 1 maggio 2016 Lecce, visite guidate alla collezione.
·         Inaugurazione della Casa-museo Spada, antichi strumenti musicali, 22 agosto 2016 Lecce, con l’esibizione degli MCCS.
·         Italia da stimare, RAI 1, 12 luglio 2015, presentazione della nuova sede della Collezione Spada.
·         Giocando si impara a suonare, Sava 29 Dicembre 2013, i giocattoli musicali della Collezione Spada.
·         Mostra del giocattolo musicale, Taranto, settimana dei diritti dell’infanzia 18 – 24 Novembre 2013.

·         Museo Migrante 2013, 14 Aprile Taranto, 21 Aprile Sava (TA), 7 Maggio Giovinazzo (BA), 11 Maggio Francavilla Fontana (BR), 19 Maggio Napoli, 25 Maggio Bari, 2 Giugno S. Giorgio (TA), 14 Giugno Rutigliano (BA), 22 Giugno Lecce, 7 Luglio Cutrofiano (LE).
·         Flauti: tra musica popolare e musica colta, Festival della musica popolare, Festival della zampogna, tenutosi a Maranola (LT) il 19 - 20 Gennaio 2013.
·         Giornate Europee del Patrimonio 2011, Montemesola (TA) 24 - 25 Settembre 2011, visite guidate alla Collezione Spada e concerti dei MCCS.
·         Musicultura 4° edizione, Matino (LE)14 Maggio 2011, mostra: La chitarra di Mazzini, La chitarra italiana dell’Ottocento dalla Collezione Spada.
·         Musicultura 3° edizione, Matino (LE)16 Maggio 2010, mostra: Gli strumenti a fiato dal ‘700 ai primi ‘900 dalla Collezione Spada.
·         Gli strumenti da banda, Montescaglioso (MT) il 28 Dicembre 2008, strumenti da banda dalla Collezione Spada. In occasione del convegno: HARMONIEMUSIK, LA BANDA ieri, oggi e domani

·         Musica fuori dai teatri, Grottaglie (TA) 9 Marzo – 25 Maggio 2008, strumenti popolari e da strada dalla Collezione Spada.
·         Gli strumenti della maraviglia, Brindisi 28 Agosto – 30 Agosto 2007, in occasione del Barocco Festival.
·         Antiche chitarre dalla Puglia e dal mondo, a Mottola 15 e 16 Luglio 2006 in occasione del Festival internazionale della chitarra.
·         Mauro Giuliani (1781 – 1829) curiosità di famiglia, Pinacoteca Provinciale di Bari 17 Settembre – 19 Novembre 2005.
·         Ancia, doppia ancia e flauti popolari tenutosi a Maranola il 23 Gennaio 2005, durante il Festival di musica e cultura popolare La Zampogna.
·         Chitarre e mandolini, Mottola (TA)10 Luglio – 19 Luglio 2004 in occasione del Festival internazionale della chitarra.
·         Musica Ritrovata 6 Bari 13 Novembre 5 Dicembre 2004, giovani artisti e musica antica nel cuore di Bari.
·         Antichi strumenti musicali in Puglia, S. Cesarea Terme (LE), 13 Luglio - 21 Luglio 2002.
·         Strumenti a fiato in legno dalle collezioni private italiane, Bologna 19 Maggio – 1 Luglio 2001.
·         Il tempo di Niccolò Piccinni, Bari, Castello Svevo, 30 Settembre – 6 Dicembre 2000.

·         Gli strumenti musicali, Martina Franca Luglio 1999, durante il Festival della Valle d’Itria.

RASSEGNA STAMPA

RAI3 TG PUGLIA Mimmo Spina



RAI1 ITALIA DA STIMARE Massimiliano Pani e Marco Cerbella

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RAI3 IL SETTIMANALE Raffaele Nigro


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QUOTIDIANO DI LECCE 20 MAGGIO 2016



IL MANIFESTO 9 OTTOBRE 2010


CORRIERE DELLA SERA 15 OTTOBRE 2012









QUOTIDIANO DI LECCE 6 SETTEMBRE 2015







































CORRIERE DEL MEZZOGIORNO 22 MARZO 2013




CONTATTI E PRENOTAZIONI

La collezione è visitabile ogni sabato, domenica e festivi prenotando alla mail collezionespada@gmail.com o telefonando al numero +39.328.7496672


OSPITALITA'













La Collezione Spada consiglia a chi intende passare un periodo nel cuore del Salento un bellissimo appartamento con 5 posti letto a due passi dal centro storico 

VAI ALLA PAGINA SUL SITO AIRBNB 

MUSICA DELL'INFANZIA


B. 23.      Italian ¾ violin, having the tag: A. MONZINO & FIGLI / Milano – via Rastrelli, 10 / PREMIATA LIUTERIA ARTISTICA. In addition to the tag, there is an ink writing: ANTONIUS STRADIVARIUS CRAEMONENSIS / FACIEBAT ANNO 17 and the symbol with two concentric circles, the cross and the letters A S. The instrument has a belly made of fir, back and ribs made of maple with fiddleback and, under the ebonised fingerboard, a planking measuring about one millimetre. Total length 571mm (22.5”), width of upper bout 155mm (6.1), width of lower bout 191mm (7.5).

B. 27.      Three-stringed sonometer dating back to the first decade of 20th century. The sonometer is an instrument that determines the pitch of a sound, that is the number of its vibrations. It uses the property that the number of vibrations of a tensed string, if the tension doesn’t vary, has inverse ratio than its length. The sonometer consists of a wooden rectangular box that has, at its ends, two fixed bridges on which the strings lie. These are fastened to one end with some screw machineries and to the other end with some springs. If we want to limit the vibrating part of the string, we can press it on a third bridge that slides at our choosing along the instrument. We can read the length of the vibrating part on a scale drawn along the string. This instrument is 63mm (2.5”) wide, 850mm (33.45”) long, diapason 61mm (2.4”). On the sound board there are four circular holes and the scale with the caption: L. E. Knott Apparatus Co. / Boston, Mass. while on the back there is a ruined title block where you can read: SONOMETER NO. 53 – 11 / L. E. Knott Apparatus Co. / CAMBRIDGE, Mass.

B. 31.      Ochydactyl, instrument used by musician and typists to improve the agility and the stretching apart of the fingers, datable to early 20th century. It is made of five slots for the fingers continuing on long levers connected to some springs that could be arranged on several positions, letting to set the “strength”. The whole structure is made of metal and is 110mm (4.35”) long, 165mm (6.5”) broad, and 110mm (4.35”) wide, while the levers are 265mm (10.45”) long.

B. 32.      Anonymous bowed psaltery probably made during the first half of 20th century. It is a variation of the psaltery; in this variation the sound is realised by rubbing the metal strings with a small bow. The possibility to easily play the strings of the diatonic sounds as well as the strings of the accidental sounds causes the instrument to have to be in a triangular shape. It is an isosceles triangle with harmonic-steel strings arranged perpendicularly on the shorter side, rubbed by a bow. On the right side there are the natural notes and on the left side the accidental notes. The peculiarity of this instrument is due to its sound, rich of harmonics and resonances. The dimensions of the long sides are 585mm (23.05”) while the base is 195mm (7.65”). It has a short bow and 26 strings with a range from F4 to G5.

F. 7.        Flageolets made of celluloid by Charles Ullmann between 1890 and 1895. The first, with quadrangular section (but cylindrical base), is 223mm (8.75”) long with 6 holes and decorations made of false tortoiseshell, is branded: Atlas / five-pointed star U five-pointed star / Paris / deposee and on the back: n* 2299 / SOL / G. The second, cylindrical, with six front holes, is 251mm (9.9”) long, branded: Atlas / five-pointed star U five-pointed star / Paris / deposee and on the back: n* 2290 / FA / F.

F. 33.      Flautino, probably Campanian, datable to the first half of 19th century. The instrument, with a very high pitch, presents four front holes and a back hole, a wooden fipple and the length of 108mm (4.25”).

F. 41.      Recorder with close barrel, datable between the end of 18th century and the beginning of 19th century, anonymous, made of ivory with five holes (two front holes, one back hole, and two side holes), scale: G, A, B, D, E, G. The instrument is 75mm (2.95”) long, 47mm (1.85”) wide, and shows a little pin at the foot.

F. 43.      French flageolet d’oiseau, anonymous, datable to the second half of 18th century, made of ivory in the shape of a branch with beak, foot, and knots coloured brown. It is an instrument with four front holes and two back holes for the thumbs. The invention of this instrument is attributed to Charles Burney, in Juvigny Sieur de Paris, who played it for Ballet Comique de la Reine. The instrument has been described and illustrated by Marin Mersenne (1588 - 1648) in his Harmonie Universelle in 1636 (fifth book "woodwinds A"). The first found flageolet method is Thomas Saluto’s “The Pleasant Companion: or New Lessons and Instructions for the Flagelet”. It was used also for 17th century art music, for example in an instrumental overture for two flageolets in Abelle orathory by Pietro Torri, in Brussels in 1695. The flageolet d’oiseau was later used in 18th century by Vivaldi, Handel, and Gluck.

F. 45.      Anonymous flautino, stained wood, six front holes and with a small slit at the side of the lip of the box. The profile wave (Wellenprofil) specifically recalls the tools of the school of Nuremberg late 600 / early 700. The instrument is high mm. 118.

K. 14.      Little celesta (celestino, glockenspiel) from Germany, made at the beginning of 20th century. The celesta is an idiophone instrument, that is producing the sound from the material it is composed, without tighten parts: in this case, it’s a percussion instrument, in appearance similar to a little piano. The sound, with a peculiar timbre similar to a music box, is produced by some metal cups suspended and struck by a system of little hammers controlled with a keyboard similar to the keyboard of a piano. The sonority it can produce is soft, muffled in lower notes, bright in middle notes, and brilliant in higher notes. Made and patented in 1886 by the French Auguste Mustel, the celesta was played for the first time in the musical world for the ballet The Nutcracker, by Pëtr Il'ič Čajkovskij, in “Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy”. This instrument is 300mm (11.8”) high, 460mm (18.1”) broad, and 271mm (10.65”) wide at the level of the keyboard; it presents 25 keys (from A4 to E6) even if the outer keys does not produce any sound.

L. 13.      Mouth accordion, reed wind instrument made in Germany at the beginning of 20th century. It has a trumpet embouchure and a parallelepipedic body (224 x 99 x 57 mm – 8.8” x 3.9” x 2.25”) made of wood covered with celluloid on which there are ten melody buttons on the right and two bass keys on the left. The buttons open same holes on the wind chest that allow the reeds to vibrate.

L. 14.      Hohner-sax, sax-like instrument working like a harmonica. The air is conducted into the body of the instrument that presents twelve keys (10 + 2) corresponding to twelve notes emitted by metal reeds. This instrument has been made in Germany by Hohner during the first half of 20th century.

L. 15.      Trumpet-harmonica with eight buttons, in two brass pieces and the mouthpiece, probably French and datable to the second half of 19th century. The instrument, in shape of a trumpet, presents eight buttons connected to as many metal reeds that, playing like an accordion, produce a scale from C5 to C6. The instrument is 424mm (16.7”) long.

L. 16.      Trombone-harmonica, French, made during the first decades of 20th century, on the bell there is the label of the vendor: MUSIQUE / P. VANDERVILLE / DOUAI. The instrument with closed slide is 536mm (21.1”) long; with open slide it is 672mm (26.45”) long. Inside of the slide there are eight metal reeds that, according to the position, produce eight different notes.

L. 17.      Sax-harmonica, 1930s toy made of golden metal, about 320mm (12.6”) high, in the shape of a saxophone with a cup mouthpiece and six buttons. The buttons conduct the air to six metal reeds producing the notes (B, C, D, E, F#, G).

L. 18.      Flute-harmonica, German toy made during the first years of 20th century. The instrument is made of a wooden parallelepiped and a little side keyboard with ten round keys made of mother of pearl controlling the external metal pallets. The sound is produced by single metal reeds. The body has these dimensions: 32 x 79 x 226 mm (1.25” x 3.1” x 8.9”); the keyboard is 196mm (7.7”) long, there is an embouchure and an end made of ebonised wood with a total length of 134mm (5.25”). On the side there is the writing: Mein – Stolz.

M. 2.       Terracotta whistles, Italian, 20th century. The first represents a feminine figure, 77mm (3.05”) long, and shows an embouchure and two holes. The second is a little spherical ocarina with 4 upper holes and two lower holes. The third is a whistle in the shape of an ocarina with side embouchure, 147mm (5.8”), 2 front holes and 1 back hole with feminine faces and medallions. 2 water whistles miming the bird song, fish shape, 100mm (3.95”) long. 3 zoomorphic whistles with embouchure hole and 2 holes in the shapes of a shell (71mm – 2.8”), of a little owl (88mm – 2.45”), and of a swallow (112mm – 4.4”); the last is a zoomorphic whistle in the shape of a rooster, made by Rosario Mastro in mid 20th century of not enamelled scratched terracotta.

M. 3.       Terracotta ocarinas, 20th century. This globular flute was invented in Budrio (Bologna) in 1863 by Giuseppe Donati who was author of a notable production together with study methods, up to the creation of a virtuosos ensemble. Cesare Vicinelli during the first decades of 20th century acquired Donati’s inheritance opening another manufacturer in Budrio and, perfecting the technique, took this simple instrument to its splendour. The first two come from De Fazio manufacturer in Grottaglie and they are decorative pieces, made of pottery, 197mm (7.75”) and 145mm (5.7”) long, with 8 front holes and 2 back holes; the third comes from former East Germany, it is made of red-painted terracotta and presents 2 back holes and 8 front holes, length 185mm (7.3”); the fourth is 113mm (4.45”) long, probably Emilian, it has 8 front holes, the last a double hole, and 2 + 2 back holes; the fifth and the sixth are two big non professional ocarinas (151mm – 5.95” and 180mm – 7.1”), made of not enamelled terracotta, made by Francesco Annicchiarico; the seventh, made of black-painted terracotta, 148mm (5.8”) long, comes from Austria and presents 8 front holes and 2 back holes; the eighth and the ninth were made in Budrio, by Arrigo Mignani manufacturer, they are made of wood and have un usual hole disposition, 129mm (5.05”) and 160mm (6.3”) long; the tenth, lastly, made of black-painted wood, in D, Austrian make (branded MUSIK / AUSTRIA, the letter D and two overlapping medals), is 178mm (7”) long.

M. 6.       Bird decoy made in 19th century in France and Northern Italy. The first three are decoys for turtle doves. Two of them are made of dark wood and one is made of boxwood. They are turned in a spherical shape with a front hole and a foot. The first has the hole covered with horn and it is 137mm (5.4”) long, the second is 116mm (4.55”) long, while the third, made of pale wood, is 129mm (5.05”) long and has the hole made of horn. The last three are decoys for plovers and cuckoos, they are made of wood, with a single hole on the front, the side, or the foot and are respectively 91mm (3.6”), 62mm (2.45”), and 62mm (2.45”) long.

M. 8.       Castagnette from Sorrento, sort of handled castanets made of a middle handled piece and two side pieces that play making it resonate on the hand palm. One of them is made of fir, 189mm (1.45”) long, and the other is made of sessile oak, 147mm (5.8”), with a small circular ivory decoration on the handle.

M. 9.       Castanets made of olive wood during the first half of 20th century. These concussion instruments are in the shape of shell and are played making them resonate in the hand palms; in this case there are both the pairs of castanets. The instrument is 85 x 62 mm (3.35” x 2.45”).

M. 11.    French kazoo (mirliton), Varinette, made during the second decade of 20th century.  This instrument is made of a small wooden pipe with a middle hole and two membranes at the ends. Blowing or singing in the embouchure the membranes vibrate producing the sound.

M. 12.    Slide whistles, pair of English instruments, second half of 19th century, the first (65 mm – 2.55”) is made of ivory with an ebony slide, and the second (57 mm – 2.25”) is made of mahogany with bone slide and a border with a small brass chain.

M. 21.    Toy in the shape of a shawm with metal vibrating reed and four metal keys that make the notes vary. Made of two wood pieces in central Italy in mid 19th century.

M. 23.    English kazoo made during the first decades of 20th century, ebonite body 114mm (4.5”) long, and two metal bells for the vibrating reeds. Brand: SWANEE / SAZZAFONE / REG. / MADE IN LONDON / ENGLAND / PRO. PAT. / REG. DESIGN / REG. U.S. PAT. OFF.

M. 24.    Mirliton, probably made in Northern Italy between the end of 18th century and the beginning of 19th century. Cylindrical body, made of wood, 341mm (13.4”) long, covered with green paper with blue and red dots. The ends are made of elegantly turned natural wood, one of them with eight vent holes and the other with the embouchure and the vibrating membrane.

M. 25.    Mirliton, probably made in Italy between the end of 18th century and the beginning of 19th century. The cylindrical body, 261mm (10.25”) long, is made of turned wood and presents at one end the embouchure and 24 vent holes. The two end pins are made of ebony with the total length of 303mm (11.9”).

M. 26.    Mirliton, probably made in Venice between the end of 18th century and the beginning of 19th century. It presents a cylindrical body, made of brown-coloured wood, with the embouchure and 8 vent holes. The two ends, where there are the membranes, are screwed in the body with a total length of 223mm (8.75”).

M. 27.    Toy xylophone, made in Switzerland at the end of 19th century. The instrument is made of 12 metal bars (from C4 to F5) fixed on a wooden stand inserted in a wooden box (dimensions 371 x 133 x 48 mm – 14.6” x 5.25” x 1.9”) covered with coloured paper with illustrations of playing children. Inside there is a small wooden mallet.

M. 28.    Eunuch flute, probably Neapolitan, datable to the second half / end of 18th century. The eunuch flute is basically a mirliton with the sound membrane only at one end, professional, often refined, make. This instrument presents the body, lightly conical, made of stained wood, two rods and the ends made of finely carved bone. The embouchure hole is on the narrow part of the body, near the membrane that, hidden by the bone protection, was fixed whit a twine to the knurled tenon: the total length of the instrument is 273mm (10.75”).

M. 31.    Instruments for crèche musician shepherds, Neapolitan, datable to mid 19th century. The instruments are a cornamusa zoppa, type from Molise, with bag made of animal bladder and wooden body, and a wooden shawm, made in a detailed way very faithful to the original.

M. 32.    Decoys for quails made of donkey leather, Italian, datable to the first decades of 20th century. These instruments were made of bags of reversed donkey leather; five of them have a piece of sheep bone (shinbone), and two of them have a metal pipe with a hole used as a fipple. The sound is emitted pressing the bag. The instruments are respectively 210mm (8.25”), 182mm (7.15”), 155mm (6.1”), 154mm (6.05”), 146mm (5.75”), 157mm (6.2”) and 132mm (5.2”) long.

M. 34.    Toy xylophone made in the United States in 1930, in his original box. The instrument is made of eight metal bars fixed on a metal trapezoidal stand that is 256mm (10.05”) long with the sides being 106mm (4.15”) and 75mm (2.95”) long. There are also two mallets made of coloured wood and some scores with simple songs.

M. 35.    Bird decoys, Italian, datable to the first decades of 20th century. The first, for thrushes, is made of a cylindrical bellows, 38mm (1.5”) wide and 64mm (2.5”) high, made of a spring with leather covering that, closed at the end by a wooden stopper, blow the air in a metal cylinder at the bottom that produces the sound. The second, for thrushes, is similar to the first with dimensions 38 x 60 mm (1.5” x 2.35”). The third is a decoy for black-winged stilts and it is a wooden cylinder, 133mm (5.25”) high, with a cogwheel and a plate on the top. The fourth is a decoy for magpies made of brass and green plastic, 94mm (3.7”) high. The fifth is a decoy for magpies made of brass and pink plastic, 109mm (4.3”) long. The sixth is pyriform, made of brass, for blackbirds, and is played by inhaling, 62mm (2.45”). The seventh, for blackbirds, similar to the previous, 69mm (2.7”) long. The eighth is 79mm (3.1”) long, for thrushes, made of a wooden parallelepiped and the sound is produced by the rubbing of the metal screw inside of it. The ninth is a metal decoy, for larks, with a long embouchure and a small cylinder as the base, with total dimensions of 51mm (2”). The tenth, for blackbirds, is a small flat cylinder made of metal, 24 x 20 mm (0.95” x 0.8”). The eleventh, for blackbirds, is similar to the previous, with dimensions 28 x 7 mm (1.1” x 0.25”). The twelfth, for blackbirds, is similar to the previous, with dimensions 37 x 14 mm (1.45” x 0.55”). The thirteenth is a small conical decoy for larks made of bone, 27mm (1.05”). The fourteenth is a decoy for marine birds, made of wood painted black, 86mm (3.4”) high, with a spherical embouchure and a cylindrical body. The fifteenth is a cylindrical boatswain whistle made of metal, 73mm (8.25”). The sixteenth is a decoy for marine birds, pyriform, made of wood painted black, 55mm (2.15”). The seventeenth is a decoy for mallards, made of wood painted black, conical, 104mm (4.1”) high. The eighteenth is a decoy for ducks made of sheep bone, cylindrical, 62mm (2.45”) long. The nineteenth is a globular whistle, for turtle doves, made of brown plastic, 115mm (4.5”) long.

M. 36.    German toys, made of tinplate cylinders with childhood decorations and a crank on the top that, when turned, produces the sounds. The instruments have different dimensions: one is 74 x 76 mm (2.9” x 3”) and is decorated with some puppies; three are 90 x 82 mm (3.55” x 3.2”) and are decorated with circus scenes, with a redhead child, and with bunnies and bear cubs; the fifth is 110 x 106 mm (4.3” x 4.15”) and is decorated with playing children.

M. 40.    Decoys for marine birds made of pale wood, Piedmontese, datable to mid 20th century. The first is 120mm (4.7”) long and presents a small embouchure hole and a big opening at the base. The second, lightly cylindrical, 105mm (4.15”) long, has a big embouchure and vent hole. The third, 107mm (4.2”) long, has the shape recalling a bottle with a small hole on the top and a fipple on the neck, and it has the foot closed. The fourth has the shape of a cross, 74 x 115 mm (2.9” x 4.5”), with the embouchure and the fipple on the small side, a hole on the right side, and a little inner cylinder. The fifth is similar to the previous with dimensions 54 x 64 mm (2.1” x 2.5”) but with two holes at the end of the side arms. The sixth is a 103 mm (4.05”) whistle, open at the foot, with an upper embouchure and a fipple on the body. The seventh and the eighth are similar to the previous but their dimensions are 85mm (3.35”) and 72mm (2.85”). The last is a small whistle, closed at the foot, 68mm (2.65”) long.

M. 49.    Neapolitan crèche musicians, made of polychrome terracotta, folk make, datable to the second half of 19th century. This little collection of eight figures copies the Moor bands of Neapolitan crèche since 18th century and it is made of trumpet, trombone, cymbals, drum, and serpent players with their typical Turkish costumes.

M. 51.    Whistles from various origin. The first is a hunting whistle from Piedmont, made of ivory with the head of a satyr, about 80mm (3.15”) long and datable to early 19th century. The second is a hunting whistle made of black horn with the head of a dog, Piedmontese, 75mm (2.95”) long, datable to mid 18th century. The third a hunting bone whistle, cylindrical, 50mm (1.95”) long, and datable to mid 19th century. The fourth is a whistle for falcons made of bone, datable to the end of 18th century, 46mm (1.8”) long, while the last is a small bone flute in the shape of a fish, with 4+1 holes, 110mm (4.35”) long, datable to mid 19th century.

M. 52.    Toys for babies, dating back to 1950s: 1) tinplate ratchet, 80mm (3.15”) wide and 12mm (0.45”) high, with the head of a clown drawn on the top; 2) rattle made of silvered metal, consisting of a 37mm (1.45”) wide sphere with a small marble inside, and a 146mm (5.75”) long twisting handle.

M. 55.    Couple of toy rattles with metal reed whistle. The two toys date back to 1930s, they are made of tinplate and are 108mm (4.25”) long. The handle is in the shape of a conical-frustum and on the free end there is the embouchure hole of the whistle while on the other end there is a cylinder, 38mm (1.5”) wide and 20mm (0.8”) high, with drawings of children, containing little pieces of metal that give the sound to the rattle. The first has the drawing of a boxer child while the second has the drawing of a musketeer child.

M. 56.    Toy diatonic button accordions dating back to 1940s, German, made of pressed cardboard. One of them has six melody buttons, red sides with golden borders, and the bellows made of floral paper, with dimensions 208 x 106 x 63 mm (8.2” x 4.15” x 2.5”). The other one has ten buttons and two basses, red sides, and bellows with golden borders with a metal support, with dimensions 214 x 114 x 86 mm (8.4” x 4.5” x 3.4”).

M. 57.    French flageolet (flageolet d'oiseau) and whistle for children, made of wood, dating back to 1940s. The flageolet is 102mm (4”) long and presents four front holes and a back hole with a large embouchure and an approximate fipple. The whistle is made of amaranth-coloured wood, 47mm (1.85”) long.

M. 58.    Metal tambourine and couple of musician puppets, toys dating back to 1950s. The tambourine is made of tinplate coloured green and yellow with figures of anthropomorphic animals and little house, German, branded Agatex, dimensions 162 x 39 mm (6.35” x 1.55”); it has a hole for the thumb and three pair (one missing) of jingles. The puppets are two musicians of bass drum and cymbals, put on a 148 x 68mm (5.8” x 2.65”) base with wheels. The child, pushing the base with a long (missing) shaft, make the wheel rotate on the ground and these, with a simple mechanism, make the puppets move.

M. 62.    Hohner soprano melodica, made in 1959 of green metal with black and white keys. The range is two octaves (from C4 to C6). The melodica is a musical instrument similar to the accordion and the harmonica created by Hohner in 1950: it is a free reeds aerophone with keyboard. The melodica, also known as pianica, blow-organ, or key-flute, has a keyboard with 25 notes on the top and it is played blowing the air through a mouthpiece. This instrument is 338mm (13.3”) long, 59mm (2.3”) wide, and has its original cardboard case.

M. 63.    Hohner alto melodica, made in 1959 of red metal with black and white keys. The range is two octaves (from F3 to F5). The melodica is a musical instrument similar to the accordion and the harmonica created by Hohner in 1950: it is a free reeds aerophone with keyboard. The melodica, also known as pianica, blow-organ, or key-flute, has a keyboard with 25 notes on the top and it is played blowing the air through a mouthpiece. This instrument is 338mm (13.3”) long, 59mm (2.3”) wide, and it has its original cardboard case and two mouthpieces, one black and one white, with a different air opening.

M. 64.    Kazoo made of pale wood, French, datable to early 20th century. The instrument has two side membranes with changeable tension by means of a screw system, and a central embouchure hole. It is contained in a wooden rounded case.

M. 65.    Zellophone, American toy produced during the third decade of 20th century by J. Pressman & co. Inc. in New York (n° 610). The Pressman Toy Corporation was founded in 1922 by Jack Pressman and specialised in producing folk toys with decent quality and, till 1947, it produced toys inspired to Walt Disney production. This is a sort of xylophone with the sounding body made of eight glass tubes beaten with a wooden mallet. The dimensions of the cardboard box, also used as a support for the instrument, are 40 x 230 mm (1.55” x 9.05”) and inside there are, besides the eight glass tubes, a series of six short melodies that could be played with the instrument.

M. 67.    Ocarinas (quartet) made of white terracotta by the Apulian Giorgio Cataldi. These are the result of the continuous experimentation tending to increase the range of this one-chambered instrument into alto and tenor ranges and to improve the sounds and the weight for bass and contrabass ranges. The tuning are in C (141mm – 5.55”), in G (146mm – 5.75”), in F (149mm – 5.85”) and double-chambered bass in C (272mm – 10.7”). The instruments are branded G CAT and on the embouchure there is the indication of the tuning, they have two back holes and eight front holes with the last and the third to last as double holes. The bass has only the third to last hole of the lower body as a double hole while the higher chamber has five front holes and two back holes.

M. 68.    Toy in the shape of a clarinet, anonymous, probably German, dating back to the end of 19th century. The instrument is made of a cylindrical body and a lightly flared bell made of wood painted black with a pale wood embouchure. The total length is 354mm (13.95”). On the body there are six keys that, activated, free some metal reeds producing as many notes.

M. 69.    Contrabass ocarina made of “Etruscan” clay by Giorgio Cataldi in 2013. This is the biggest shape this instrument can reach: the length is 360mm (14.5”) while the diameter at the embouchure is 401mm (15.8”). Besides the fipple hole, there are two back holes for the thumbs and, on the front, four holes for the right hand and three holes for the left hand.

M. 70.    Ocarina in C made of red clay in 2013 by Giorgio Cataldi. The instrument presents two back holes for the thumbs and the fipple hole while on the front there are four holes for the left hand and four hole for the right hand with the last being a double hole. The length is 179mm (7.05”).

M. 71.    Whistle made of metal datable to early 20th century, very little and probably made for a child.

M. 72.    Tin trumpets, first half of 20th century, Italian, produced by Marchesini manufacturer. Agostino Marchesini manufacturer was born in 1908 and was one of the oldest toy manufacturers, with offices in Bologna, branded its toys with the initials AMB Bologna. The instruments are 110mm (4.35”) high and they have a metal reed to produce the sound. The first is coloured with black, red, and white squares; the second with blue, red, and black squares on a red background. They both have a small blue handle and a white embouchure.

M. 78.    Salentino toy tambourine, datable to mid 20th century, made of beechwood and leather with three pairs of metal sheet jingles. The diameter is 183mm (7.2”) and the height of the rim is 48mm (1.9”). In addition to three holes for the jingles, on the rim there is a circular hole for the grip.

M. 79.    Stock, two chanters, and two drones of a Calabrian sordulina in G, datable to the first half of 20th century. There are two chanter of the same length, a shorter drone and a longer drone, both longer than the chanters, each one with inner cylindrical bore with diameter measuring 8mm (0.3”). This instrument is made of wood decorated with geometric shapes, meanders, and leaves except for the longer drone that seems to have been restored. All the canes finish with large bells (110mm -4.35”- for the chanters, 120mm -4.7”- and 105 -4.15”- for the drones) having a merely aesthetic function, because the inner bore is always cylindrical. The two chanters, starting from the stock, measure 208mm (8.2”), with four holes for the fingers for “ritta” (right hand) and “manca” (left hand); on the first there is a sound hole, while the second is wedged with a piece of wax that allow to silence the chanter by closing all the holes. The higher drone (“fischietto” or “scandillo”) measures 112mm (4.4”) and the lower one (“trumm” or “trombone”) measures 232mm (9.15”). The stock, with conical-frustum shape, is 131mm (5.15”) high and, at the base, 135mm (5.3”) wide.          

M. 80.    Harmonica, anonymous, probably built in the first half of the twentieth century and consists of a red-painted parallelepiped wooden, sized mm. 415 x 120 x 74 which contains the metal reeds. On the left side is placed a kind of wind chest, in dark wood, with 22 long (mm. 215) keys that open the hole for the air vent. The insufflator is made from a thick copper tube positioned on the short side of the instrument while on the right side there is a leather handle.

M. 81.    Clarina, German musical toy, made by Hohner in the '60s. The height is mm. 390, mouthpiece and bell are made of white plastic while the body, cylindrical mm. 300, is covered with black linen paper. There are eight keys (Do major), which, driven by the right hand, they open the holes and bring into vibration of metal reeds that produce the notes.

O. 2.       Playasax, mechanical instrument, American, made during the first half of 20th century, in the shape of a small saxophone and made of a sort of harmonica with metal reeds that play guided by a pierced sheet of paper mounted on two wooden music rolls and activated by a crank. The piece on the barrel is: QRS Playasax, P136 Marching Thru Georgia.


O. 6.       Italian music box, made during the first decades of 20th century. The metal instrument has the shape of a roundabout with four horses made of Bakelite in the centre and four wooden figures of children playing on the roundabout. On the top there are four small red lights supplied by a battery.